Cost-cutting techniques to fit your lifestyle
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Jul 08, 2013 | 32038 views | 0 0 comments | 757 757 recommendations | email to a friend | print
(BPT) - These days, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the multitude of sources offering money-saving tips. It seems like everyone has a hot new tip or an old tried-and-true method you just have to try. Unfortunately, trying to keep up with them all can actually be counter-productive to your savings goal because you aren’t able to dedicate enough time and effort to see substantial results.

So how do you choose which tip to focus on? The answer is easy. Look at your personal lifestyle to figure out the savings tactic that will work best for you. 

* For the serial over-achiever

Sure, you probably have the energy to coupon "til the cows come home," but that is not the most efficient use of your time. Try setting a goal. Your first step should be to figure out how much you would like to save each month so you can stop yourself once you hit that goal. Of course saving more than what you estimated would be great, but it’s important to maintain a healthy coupon/life balance.

And don’t be afraid to multitask! “When I was working full time, I would use my breaks and lunch to cut out the coupons I would need to shop and sometimes also shop on my lunch hour,” says Jennifer Williams, founder of “My Frugal Wife” blog. Cutting coupons while you eat or while the kids are doing homework means you aren’t skipping important parts of your day to get couponing done.

The important thing is to manage the time you spend couponing so that it does not add stress to your already-busy life.  

* For the rewards program skeptic

You may think that the concept of saving is all well and good, but when it comes to the practice of participating in rewards programs you are not sure that the effort matches the savings.

This can be true, especially if you try to juggle too many programs at once. Participating in more rewards programs does not necessarily mean more savings. In fact, there are an average of 21.9 rewards program memberships per household in the U.S., according to the 2013 Colloquy Loyalty Census, yet individuals are only active in 44 percent of the rewards programs they are signed up for.

Save more by focusing your efforts on the right program for you. “Find a program that allows you to save on your most frequent purchases,” says Heather Brickell, founder of “My Sweet Savings” blog. “A rewards program such as the Fuel Rewards Network(TM) program – or FRN(TM) program – is valuable because your savings pay off at the pump – one of the hardest places to save money or get a discount.”

The FRN program allows you to redeem rewards for fuel savings at participating Shell stations. There are multiple ways to earn rewards through everyday purchases of things like food, clothing and household goods.

Participating in a program that allows you to earn rewards without having to step outside of your normal routine can help you save regularly without the stress. 

* For the on-the-go lifestyle

Don’t have time to spend hours cutting coupons or scouring the Internet for deals? No problem. If you are constantly on the go, but still looking to save money, Brickell suggests looking into downloadable smartphone apps that will allow you to save money on everything from clothing, dining out, and travel. “Apps are easy to use and many retailers and even restaurants will scan discount codes right from your smartphone,” says Brickell.

Download a few choice apps and begin scanning them whenever you have a free moment in your day. It’s quick and easy because, let’s face it, your phone never leaves your side.

Just remember, if you are doing something – anything – to save, then count that as a success! You can create a consistent stream of savings without having to spend all of your time worrying about making it happen. For example, Wayne Wesley, an everyday consumer from Florida who commutes 60 miles per day for work, also takes advantage of the FRN program’s ease of use. “I am not the kind of person who would use coupons or spends a lot of time hunting for bargains,” says Wesley, who estimates he’s saved more than $500 using the FRN program over the past year. “But I earn rewards at my grocery store each week and usually save between 35 and 95 cents per gallon when I fill up. It's an easy way I save money each month without much effort.”

The bottom line is that you can cut costs and save in a way that works for you. Don’t let time or multiple rewards programs and savings tactics overwhelm you; just pick the one that is right for you and stick with it. The savings can really add up over time!

Copyright 2013 The Times-Independent. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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