GCHS marching band outshines Colorado state champion
by Mary Rice
contributing writer
Oct 11, 2012 | 1202 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Grand County High School marching band, led by drum major Adam Jenkinson, finishes their performance of “Hey Jude” at a band competition in Grand Junction, Colo., on Saturday. The Red Devils took first place in the 2A division, beating the reigning Colorado 2A champion, Delta High School.
Photo courtesy of Richard Jenkinson
The Grand County High School marching band, led by drum major Adam Jenkinson, finishes their performance of “Hey Jude” at a band competition in Grand Junction, Colo., on Saturday. The Red Devils took first place in the 2A division, beating the reigning Colorado 2A champion, Delta High School. Photo courtesy of Richard Jenkinson
slideshow


The Grand County High School marching band took first place Oct. 6 in a competition in Grand Junction, Colo. The Red Devil band defeated Colorado’s 2A state champions, Delta High School, by one point to bring home the honors.

The win came just a week after the marching band began its competitive season by placing fourth in a competition at Payson, Utah.

On Saturday, Sept. 29, just after performing for the first time at the homecoming game, the Red Devil marching band traveled to Payson to compete in the Nebo band show. Grand was heavily penalized for being one song short of a full show, said band director Don McGuire. But the Red Devils’ solid performance still earned them a place in the rankings, just behind West Jordan, Timpanogos, and Salem Hills.

“Nebo was our first competition, and we were a little incomplete so we were docked for it,” McGuire said. “But it was a perfect day for competition. We did well, and I think we finished where we should have based on what I saw of the other shows… We had some serious holes at Payson, but I think we’ve got the biggest ones plugged at this point.”

McGuire said he believes that the rankings are not necessarily “the best indicator” of what the GCHS marching band is capable of.

“I think the bigger thing, that tells you more about what people think of our music, was how the audience reacted to us,” McGuire said. “We got a standing ovation at Payson... I think that, more than anything else, shows how top-notch this band is. It shows that we’re reaching our audience. More than the placings, that standing ovation is what I feel best about.”

The audience in Colorado also loved the GCHS marching band’s performance, McGuire said, adding that the win over Delta was a very close competition.

“We took first by just one point, so it was very, very close,” he said. “But hey, we beat the defending Colorado state champion.”

During the competitions, the bands are judged in a total of 14 categories, ranging from the color guard performance to music selections and performance. Delta and Grand scored within two points of one another in each category, but in the end, the Red Devils came out on top – and received another standing ovation, according to McGuire.

McGuire said he does not think any one particular aspect or part of the band pushed the team to victory. Rather, it was a full team effort.

“I think everybody loves our entrance and exit, but the thing about marching band is you live and die together,” McGuire said. “There’s no one group that dominates the team to win.”

McGuire also thanked the parents who helped with the band’s production.

“We have almost as many parents involved with this as kids,” he said. “We’ve got parents who haul materials, help set up, who do uniforms, food, drive the kids… if we didn’t have all of their help, we wouldn’t have a show, so we’re incredibly grateful for everything they’ve done.”

The Red Devils are not scheduled to compete again until Oct. 27, when they will travel to Pleasant Grove, Utah to perform. Meanwhile, the musicians will spend the off time polishing their performance.

“We’re really working hard here, and we’re going to be pushing right up until Pleasant Grove,” McGuire said. “Still, our crowds, our at-home and our away crowds have responded so well, and that means more than the placings to me. Our audiences have really responded to our show, and that’s incredibly gratifying.”

Copyright 2013 The Times-Independent. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

report abuse...

Express yourself:

We're glad to give readers a forum to express their points of view on issues important to this community. That forum is the “Letters to the Editor.” Letters to the editor may be submitted directly to The Times-Independent through this link and will be published in the print edition of the newspaper. All letters must be the original work of the letter writer – form letters will not be accepted. All letters must include the actual first and last name of the letter writer, the writer’s address, city and state and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be accepted.

Letters may not exceed 400 words in length, must be regarding issues of general interest to the community, and may not include personal attacks, offensive language, ethnic or racial slurs, or attacks on personal or religious beliefs. Letters should focus on a single issue. Letters that proselytize or focus on theological debates will not be published. During political campaigns, The Times-Independent will not publish letters supporting or opposing any local candidate. Thank you letters are generally not accepted for publication unless the letter has a public purpose. Thank you letters dealing with private matters that compliment or complain about a business or individual will not be published. Nor will letters listing the names of individuals and/or businesses that supported a cause or event. Thank you letters about good Samaritan acts will be considered at the discretion of the newspaper.