Personalized Valentines that last all year long
by Brandpoint (ARA) Sponsored Content
Jan 17, 2014 | 44946 views | 0 0 comments | 143 143 recommendations | email to a friend | print


(BPT) - Americans spent more than $13 billion on Valentine's Day gifts last year. Sixty-four percent of men gave their significant other flowers and a card, and took them out to dinner, according to the Retail Advertising and Marketing Association.

Valentine's Day is full of expectations, so how do you show your unique appreciation and love by doing the same thing everybody else does on that same exact day?

The answer: You don't.

People associate Valentine's Day with love and romance but you don't have to limit the experience to just that one day. With a little thought, you can show you care all throughout the year. Here are some ideas.

Engrave your love

Make the romance last with a gift of engraved jewelry this Valentine's Day, says Amy Myers, vice president of creative services at Things Remembered.

"When you give engraved jewelry, you give a memory,' says Myers. 'You can tell her how much you love her smile and how much she means to you today and every day. She will think of you every time she wears it, so the feeling and the meaning behind your gift lasts long past Feb.14.'

Things Remembered also offers engraved jewelry and accessories for men, including dog tag necklaces, wallets, ID bracelets, key chains, watches and pocket knives.

'You can create a really unique and special gift for the man in your life that he can wear under his shirt or on his wrist without getting a ribbing from the guys,' Myers says. 'We can engrave your message for him so only he can see it.'

Things Remembered also offers a buy online and pick up in store option so you can order that necklace or bracelet on the sly. Visit www.thingsremembered.com.

A poet and you didn't know it

Wow her with an amazing poem from your heart. If you're not the modern day version of E.E. Cummings, don't worry. Consider printing out the lyrics to 'your' song or perhaps a few lines from her favorite romantic movie that convey your love.

Frame the poem or printed lyrics for her nightstand or desk so that she may be reminded of the love you share. And, of course, to prevent those special words from getting shoved in a drawer or taped into a scrapbook like the 151 million greeting cards that are exchanged for Valentine's Day each year.

Love in bloom

More than 51 percent of people will buy red roses for Valentine's Day but let's face it - flowers wilt. How does a guy who can't remember that thing about the toilet seat remember to send flowers 'just because' after Valentine's Day?

The answer is as simple as your local florist. Most florists will take payment in advance for planned bouquet deliveries so you can set up fresh flower gifts every month throughout the year while only actually thinking about it once a year.

It's one thing to be romantic one day of the year but true romance stands the test of time. Keep the passion alive and give a lasting spark to your relationship long after the Valentine's Day chocolates are gone.

Copyright 2013 The Times-Independent. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

report abuse...

Express yourself:

We're glad to give readers a forum to express their points of view on issues important to this community. That forum is the “Letters to the Editor.” Letters to the editor may be submitted directly to The Times-Independent through this link and will be published in the print edition of the newspaper. All letters must be the original work of the letter writer – form letters will not be accepted. All letters must include the actual first and last name of the letter writer, the writer’s address, city and state and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be accepted.

Letters may not exceed 400 words in length, must be regarding issues of general interest to the community, and may not include personal attacks, offensive language, ethnic or racial slurs, or attacks on personal or religious beliefs. Letters should focus on a single issue. Letters that proselytize or focus on theological debates will not be published. During political campaigns, The Times-Independent will not publish letters supporting or opposing any local candidate. Thank you letters are generally not accepted for publication unless the letter has a public purpose. Thank you letters dealing with private matters that compliment or complain about a business or individual will not be published. Nor will letters listing the names of individuals and/or businesses that supported a cause or event. Thank you letters about good Samaritan acts will be considered at the discretion of the newspaper.