Tips to keep you trekking this winter
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Dec 30, 2013 | 28265 views | 0 0 comments | 99 99 recommendations | email to a friend | print
(BPT) - Winter is in full swing, and with the magical season come the potentially unpleasant snow, ice and slippery conditions that can make driving a challenge. But, even in this less-than-ideal driving weather, Americans are ready to take on what Mother Nature throws their way. Even though 63 percent of Americans say icy roads are their top winter driving concern, 76 percent also say they are comfortable driving in snow, according to Hankook Tire's Winter Gauge Index.

And, if Americans are right - 41 percent of all Americans polled expect more snow this winter, as compared to last year - there will be plenty of opportunity to drive through a winter wonderland.

Confident and prepared is the resounding tune among drivers, and that's not just in the area of getting behind the wheel in slick conditions; Seventy-one percent of Americans spend less than one hour digging their car out of the snow and nearly half (49 percent) maintain their driveway themselves, according to the survey.

So, clean up that driveway, embrace the cold weather and get out and enjoy the winter season.

Before hitting the road for the ski slopes or embarking on a winter excursion, keep in mind Hankook's top winter driving tips:

* Keep your tires 'aired up': Ensure your tires are properly inflated. For every 10 degree Fahrenheit change in outside temperature, your tire's inflation pressure will change by about 1 pound per square inch (psi). Improperly inflated tires can lead to poor traction, decreased control and skidding.

* Slowly accelerate and decelerate: Applying engine power slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don't try to get moving in a hurry, and take extra care and time to slow down when stopping.

* Invest in a set of dedicated winter tires for your vehicle: Winter tires, like the Hankook Winter i*cept evo, are specifically designed to provide improved traction in cold, snowy and icy conditions. Whether your vehicle is front, rear or all-wheel drive, winter tires can offer an additional element of performance to get you through those tricky winter driving months.

* Check your tread to beat the snow: Worn or insufficient tread can cause skidding during the winter season, so it is important to make sure your tires are ready for the winter conditions before hitting the road. A quick way to do this is to check your tires' tread depth indicators. Tread depth indicators are small raised bars that run in-between a tire's tread blocks. When a tire's tread is worn down to these indicator bars, it's time to change to a new set of tires.

By preparing for winter's snowy surprises, you can keep on rolling throughout the slippery season.

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