Art takes flight downtown
by Doug McMurdo
The Times-Independent
Oct 18, 2018 | 1434 views | 0 0 comments | 68 68 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This bronze and steel sculpture in front of the Moab Information Center, American Eagle, is the creation of Marysvale artist Christopher Coleman. It is one of 16 new pieces the MoabArTTrails nonprofit installed downtown Saturday, Oct. 13. Coleman values the piece at $64,000, making it the most expensive of the outdoor art currently on display.                                                        Photo by Doug McMurdo
This bronze and steel sculpture in front of the Moab Information Center, American Eagle, is the creation of Marysvale artist Christopher Coleman. It is one of 16 new pieces the MoabArTTrails nonprofit installed downtown Saturday, Oct. 13. Coleman values the piece at $64,000, making it the most expensive of the outdoor art currently on display. Photo by Doug McMurdo
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The city’s outdoor art scene got a makeover Saturday when volunteers at the MoabArTTrails installed 16 new sculptures downtown.

The exhibition will be up for a year and features “a really strong show,” according to Castle Valley artist and MoabArTTrails cofounder Michael Ford Dunton, who launched Moab’s public art program in 2015 with Forces at Play, a series of sculptures he donated to Grand County.

This is the second annual sculpture exhibition the nonprofit has sponsored. Since its inception, 32 pieces have been exhibited and three have been purchased for permanent outdoor sculptures in the city.

The City of Moab, for instance, purchased a piece sculptor Christopher Coleman named Bell Tower, which is on display in front of the MARC on 100 North. MoabArTTrails purchased the piece that earned this year’s People’s Choice award, The Hatch, by Peter Hazel, which is at the entrance to the walking trail on 300 South and artist Dre Carmen donated his piece, The Keepers, which is on display at the entrance to the bike path on 100 South.

“The selection committee had to pick from 35 pieces,” said Dunton. “This year, the exhibits are larger in scale and they come from a variety of excellent mediums. They are all just very, very good.”

Dunton has two pieces, Modulus Vulcani, a basalt and steel piece valued at $16,000, and Hope Again, a work of art made from marble, stainless steel and steel. The piece is unique in that it illuminates so it can be seen at night.

The sculptures are located on 100 South, Center, 100 North, 100 West and 100 East streets. Maps with details can be found at the MARC, or online at moabarttrails.org.

Dunton encourages people to go online to the same address and vote for their favorite sculpture in the People’s Choice Award.


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