Don’t let lawmakers usurp voters’ will
Jan 31, 2019 | 260 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Editor,

On Nov. 6, Utah voters passed Proposition 3 and finally put to rest a years-long debate. Voters chose to fully expand the Medicaid program as directed under the law, without relying on waiver approval from the Trump administration. Now, Medicaid expansion must be implemented, with enrollment beginning April 1 as the voters decided.

Vulnerable Utahns cannot wait another day to get the care they need. For some individuals, this is the help they’ve been waiting for in order to get healthy and get back to work. For others, this is the key to finally access lifesaving medical treatment before it’s too late.

Yet, recent news indicates that an effort to repeal the expansion under Proposition 3 is being considered by members of the Utah Legislature. They claim the ballot initiative to expand Medicaid, now Utah state law, must be repealed and replaced with their plan, which would indefinitely delay access to care.

Any delay or significant change to Proposition 3 is a repeal of the will of the people. Calling legislative actions “fixes,” “tweaks,” or “amendments” may soften the language around repeal, but it won’t soften the harmful impact.

The legislature had six years to put together a Medicaid expansion, but it took the public to step up and get it done. Now, the same elected officials who trusted your vote to put them into office evidently don’t trust your vote to expand Medicaid. Contact your legislators and the governor today and stand up for your vote, and for the health and wellbeing of your neighbors.

–Matt Slonaker

Executive Director, Utah Health Policy Project

Copyright 2013 The Times-Independent. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

report abuse...

Express yourself:

We're glad to give readers a forum to express their points of view on issues important to this community. That forum is the “Letters to the Editor.” Letters to the editor may be submitted directly to The Times-Independent through this link and will be published in the print edition of the newspaper. All letters must be the original work of the letter writer – form letters will not be accepted. All letters must include the actual first and last name of the letter writer, the writer’s address, city and state and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be accepted.

Letters may not exceed 400 words in length, must be regarding issues of general interest to the community, and may not include personal attacks, offensive language, ethnic or racial slurs, or attacks on personal or religious beliefs. Letters should focus on a single issue. Letters that proselytize or focus on theological debates will not be published. During political campaigns, The Times-Independent will not publish letters supporting or opposing any local candidate. Thank you letters are generally not accepted for publication unless the letter has a public purpose. Thank you letters dealing with private matters that compliment or complain about a business or individual will not be published. Nor will letters listing the names of individuals and/or businesses that supported a cause or event. Thank you letters about good Samaritan acts will be considered at the discretion of the newspaper.