Wednesday, June 3, 2020

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Moab, UT

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Moab
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    Bruce Harrison, 1951 ~ 2009

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    Excerpts from Bruce’s mother, son and friends:

    Bruce was the first of five – one sister and three brothers. He enjoyed lots of camping in the South Dakota hills. “Married a peach named Pam (and divorced, but I kept her anyway!) and had a handsome son named Leaf.”

    Bruce worked in the family construction company from an early age and continued that focus here in Moab. He was an amazing carpenter.

    Bruce was the eternal hippy and adventurer. “He always loved intense physical activity. Tried the old TV Campbell Soup Flip when it was brand new at our ski area.” He never slowed down. Here in Moab, he was known for his fierce tennis games, loved to ski, skate and had recently taken up mountain biking – no holds barred.

    Bruce studied Eastern religions and held his own truth dear and uncompromised. “He believed in challenging any idea set in stone. He was an interesting and bright spot in our lives and I am so grateful to have had him for almost 58 years. I was always so glad that he had somehow found the community of Moab. It seemed almost a perfect fit for him and held incredible friends and adventures for him.”

    Bruce gave his heart and soul to music, music, music. He played the guitar, flute, mandolin, keyboard, violin and always the drums; led open mic nights at Eddie’s – and the list goes on.

    We will miss you, Bruce – you leave the legacy of reminding us to celebrate life to its fullest and to hold strong to our own sense of truth.

    Bruce’s mother, Jo, and his son, Leaf, send tremendous thanks to those who were so helpful to Bruce during his illness.

    A celebration for Bruce Harrison will be held at the Grand Center this coming Saturday, Jan. 31, from 4-7 p.m. Bring your favorite nibble, music – or “Bruce Harrison” story.

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