Wednesday, June 3, 2020

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Moab, UT

86.8 F
Moab
More

    Michial Dwaine Sowell
    1953 ~ 2009

    Featured Stories

    Leaving Guatemala

    I selected “send me where I’m needed most,” my desire to immerse myself in another country’s culture not affixed to any location in particular.

    Widespread testing is key to Moab’s path forward

    Once a person develops symptoms of COVID-19, it has likely already been days since they started unknowingly spreading the virus. As such, local health officials want to expand testing locally for the coronavirus.

    County to diversify post-virus

    The impacts of the pandemic have renewed local leaders’ focus on a topic many have worried over for years but must now confront in much starker terms: Economic diversification.

    Arches, Canyonlands to reopen May 29

    Arches and Canyonlands national parks will partially reopen to the public at the end of the month, according to a spokesperson for the parks, following guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state and local public health authorities.

    The party is over at Imagination Station art supply store

    Cindy Sue Hunter serves a customer at her art supply store, Imagination Station, which has been reconfigured to allow shoppers to do what Hunter calls “door shopping."

    Where is broadband available in Moab?

    When the superintendent of Utah schools announced last month that school would...

    Michial Dwaine Sowell died on March 7, 2009 in a tragic automobile accident.

    To all who knew him, his name was “Mike.”

    Mike was born on Thanksgiving Day to Ted Cleve Sowell and Recie Virginia Kennedy on Nov. 23, 1953 in Tyler, Tex.

    Mike was a hard worker and took pride in his work. He worked at the Rio Algom Mining Company from 1971 to 1988. He also worked at City Market, Grand County School District, City of Moab and various other jobs throughout the Moab valley. Mike came to Utah laying cable with a cable TV company and fell in love with the town and the people in it.

    Mike’s love for life was his niece Brooke and his 13 grandchildren. “He was the best grandpa ever,” stated stepson Kyle Holter.

    Mike was the happiest while sitting around the TV with a good movie and his family on a rainy day. He loved to watch football and especially so if the Green Bay Packers were playing.

    He is survived by his wife, Sherilyn, three children, Michial D. Sowell, Jr. (Seritta) of Vernal, Utah; Clifford D. Sowell (Kami); and Robert “Cleve” Sowell of Moab. He is also survived by his stepchildren, Kyle A. Holter (Andrea) of Moab, and Tracy L. Holter (Johnny Nettik) of Rocky Ford, Colo.

    He is survived by his sister, Rhonda Wilke (Gordon) of Wiley, Tex., and nephew, Chris Wright of Tyler, Tex.

    Mike is also survived by his parents-in-law, Robert and Ellen Livingston, of Grand Junction, Colo., as well as many nieces and nephews.

    He was preceded in death by daughter Kelly R. Sowell and stepson Kevin D. Holter, and his parents Ted. C. Sowell and Recie V. Sowell.

    Mike will be missed and will never be forgotten and his memory will live on through his grandchildren.

    Services were held on Wednesday, March 25 in Moab. Arrangements were by Kimmerle-Hefner Funeral Home.

    Share this!

    - Advertisement -

    Latest News

    City cuts jobs to bridge huge tax loss

    These steps are in addition to cuts made March 13 when 60 part-time employees were terminated.

    Youth spots fire, alerts authorities

    "They (firefighters) figured out where the fire was coming from … it started with a cigarette.”

    Broken bones in Left Hand

    All but one of the injuries involved jumping from rocks into a shallow pool at the base of a waterfall.

    Employment data confirms Grand is among worst hit in state

    The figures confirm earlier estimates that roughly one in five to one in six jobs in Grand County have been lost to COVID-19.

    Widespread testing is key to Moab’s path forward

    Once a person develops symptoms of COVID-19, it has likely already been days since they started unknowingly spreading the virus. As such, local health officials want to expand testing locally for the coronavirus.