Tuesday, July 7, 2020

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Moab, UT

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    PETA: Don’t leave pets in cars

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    Public submissions to The Times-Independent can range from press releases to obituaries to feature stories and news. All submissions are subject to editorial review and approval.

    Editor,

    Following recent reports that police officers in Moab responded to two separate calls of dogs being left in hot cars, PETA is issuing an urgent warning about the importance of never leaving animals in hot vehicles.

    Since last year, there have been at least 61 hot weather-related animal deaths and these are just the ones that have been reported. Most aren’t.

    On a 78-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can soar to 100 degrees in just minutes, and on a 90-degree day, the interior temperature can reach as high as 109 degrees in less than 10 minutes. A dog trapped inside can succumb to heatstroke in mere minutes, even if the vehicle is parked in the shade with the windows slightly open.

    If you see a dog left alone in a hot car, call local humane authorities or the police. Don’t leave the scene until the situation has been resolved. If the authorities are unresponsive or too slow and the dog’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness (or several) who will back up your assessment. Then remove the suffering animal from the car and wait for authorities to arrive.

    PETA offers an emergency window-breaking hammer for help intervening in these life-or-death situations.

    Thank you very much for helping to protect animals during hot weather.

    Best regards,

    – Brooke Rossi
    media coordinator
    PETA, Washington, DC

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