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    Final draft: Protect established lodging

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    Carter Papehttp://moabtimes.awebstudio.com/author/carter-pape/
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    New lodging to be banned until further notice; new rules expected before November

    Moab City Planning Commission members, members of the public and others stand over a map of established lodging developments in Moab. These developments are protected under proposed rules that continue the city’s hold on lodging developments. Photo courtesy of the City of Moab

    The Moab City Council reviewed a draft ordinance from the city’s planning commission at a meeting on Tuesday, July 9, that would remove lodging as a protected use inside city limits, protect existing lodging operations and set a soft deadline for developing new regulations by the end of the year.

    The city council now has until August 12, when its six-month moratorium on new lodging developments lapses, to vote on the new ordinances.

    The new regulations will have the effect of extending the moratorium until the city passes new regulations, which staff and planners hope to do within the next six months.

    Once those new regulations are passed, the city will likely restore lodging as a protected use within city limits while also imposing regulations on the developments.

    These new rules could include form-based codes that direct how buildings can look, performance standards controlling water and energy usage and mixed-use development rules that would require lodging developers to also enable office, retail or residential uses.

    The planning commission proposed Oct. 31 as the soft deadline for writing these new regulations. The proposal is a result of concerns that the city might be sued over the temporary rules, which disallow any new lodging developments until further notice.

    By setting a target date for developing the new rules, city staff and planners are signaling their intent to create a permanent solution to replace the temporary fix.

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