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    GCHS failed to submit 2019 AP tests

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    Principal Hren: ‘There is no excuse’

    On AP exams, students can forward their test scores to prospective universities. This year, a test proctor’s mistake meant that the final scores did not go out. Photo by Carter Pape

    A Grand County High School employee mistakenly failed to send Advanced Placement (AP) tests taken by students in 2019, possibly forcing some students who are now enrolled in college to reschedule their first semester of classes.

    According to GCHS Principal Steve Hren, the tests were supposed to be released on July 9. The test proctor, an employee of the high school who works in counseling, thought they had sent the scores, but according to Hren, “that did not happen.”

    “There is no excuse,” Hren said of the matter.

    Hren said the earliest that exam scores could be available to students and colleges was August. Depending on when the scores are released, students could get results before the deadline to drop classes. Both the University of Utah and Utah State University have late-August or early-September drop deadlines.

    “I would be more than happy to write a letter to each school’s administration to let them know of the error and it had nothing to do with the students,” Hren said.

    The principal said he discovered the mistake last week and that he then returned the completed tests to The College Board, which issues AP exam materials. The College Board also manages score reporting, although individual high schools are responsible for sending tests to The College Board before results can be sent.

    University advising and registration offices may be flexible in their response to the mistake. For example, University of Utah Associate Dean of Academic Advising Beth Howard said that she would encourage new U of U students from Moab who are affected by the mistake to work with an academic advisor on an individual basis to work out the best course of action.

    Howard said the situation was “not a deal breaker” and that students could get “very individualized” guidance from the advising center as they navigate the situation. Affected university students can contact their college’s or university’s academic advising office for help.

    “Our academic advisors will do everything possible to make sure that students are able to take the classes that best meet their needs,” Howard said. “I would strongly encourage any of the impacted students to contact the advisor they met with at orientation about the delay in receiving their official scores.”

    As for the employee who failed to send the tests, Hren said that he was addressing the issue with the individual.

    “This is a personnel issue that is being handled as all are,” Hren said. “Responsibility has been taken.”

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