Tuesday, August 4, 2020

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Moab, UT

93.9 F
Moab
More

    Washing raw poultry: Using science versus choice

    Featured Stories

    Survey: Local parents want daily in-person teaching

    “I really don’t think that 40% of all people are not going to send their kid to school.”

    Tales of Trails: Savor spectacular views from thrilling Shafer Trail

    In the 1890s, Moab pioneer brothers Frank M. And John S. Shafer developed the route from what had been a Native American pathway connecting what is now Canyonlands National Park to the river below.

    At 99, Moab man is knighted by France

    “The French people will never forget his courage and devotion to the great cause of freedom,”

    Leaving Guatemala, Part 4: ‘A year in the land of eternal spring’

    Though I planned to return someday, whether as a Peace Corps volunteer or not, this experience proved that even the best-laid plans go awry.

    Leaving Guatemala, Part 3: Sudden departure came with painful goodbyes

    Men donned wooden masks and numerous layers of sweatshirts and ponchos then proceeded to hit each other with whips as they danced around the town square.
    Submitted
    Submitted
    Public submissions to The Times-Independent can range from press releases to obituaries to feature stories and news. All submissions are subject to editorial review and approval.

    A study from the U.S. Department of Agriculture reveals that individuals are putting themselves at risk of illness when they wash or rinse raw poultry.

    “Cooking and mealtime is a special occasion for all of us as we come together with our families and friends,” said Dr. Mindy Brashears, the USDA’s deputy under secretary for food safety. “However, the public health implications of these findings should be of concern to everyone. Even when consumers think they are effectively cleaning after washing poultry, this study shows that bacteria can easily spread to other surfaces and foods. The best practice is not to wash poultry.”

    The results of the observational study showed how easy bacteria can be spread when surfaces are not effectively cleaned and sanitized. The USDA is recommending three easy options to help prevent illness when preparing poultry, or meat, in your home.

    1. Significantly decrease your risk by preparing foods that will not be cooked, such as vegetables and salads, BEFORE handling and preparing raw meat and poultry.
      • Of the participants who washed their raw poultry, 60 percent had bacteria in their sink after washing or rinsing the poultry. Even more concerning is that 14 percent still had bacteria in their sinks after they attempted to clean the sink. A total of 26 percent of participants that washed raw poultry transferred bacteria from that raw poultry to their ready-to-eat salad lettuce.
    2. Thoroughly clean and sanitize ANY surface that has potentially touched or been contaminated from raw meat and poultry, or their juices.
      • Of the participants that did not wash their raw poultry, 31 percent still managed to get bacteria from the raw poultry onto their salad lettuce. This high rate of cross-contamination was likely due to a lack of effective hand washing and contamination of the sink and utensils.
      • Clean sinks and countertops with hot soapy water and then apply a sanitizer. Wash hands immediately after handling raw meat and poultry. Wet your hands with water, lather with soap and then scrub your hands for 20 seconds.
    3. Destroy any illness-causing bacteria by cooking meat and poultry to a safe internal temperature as measured by a food thermometer. Beef, pork, lamb and veal (steaks, roasts and chops) are safe to eat at 145°F. Ground meats (burgers) are safe to eat at 160°F. Poultry (whole or ground) is safe to eat at 165°F.
      • Washing, rinsing, or brining meat and poultry in salt water, vinegar or lemon juice does not destroy bacteria. If there is anything on your raw poultry that you want to remove, pat the area with a damp paper towel and immediately wash your hands.

    “Everyone has a role to play in preventing illness from food,” said Administrator Carmen Rottenberg of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. “Please keep in mind that children, older adults, and those with compromised immune systems are especially at risk.

    Washing or rinsing raw meat and poultry can increase your risk as bacteria spreads around your kitchen, but not washing your hands for 20 seconds immediately after handling those raw foods is just as dangerous.”

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that millions of Americans are sickened with food-borne illnesses each year, resulting in roughly 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths.

    Share this!

    - Advertisement -

    Latest News

    Domestic travel not replacing global visits

    The overall figures for 2020, not just the month of June, are more striking.

    The Market on Center

    A new type of farmers market is happening in Moab this summer, and it began on July 23. Dubbed “The Market on Center,” it includes vendors selling food and produce, artisan creations and other items.

    Al fresco: COVID-19 pushes city to permit outdoor dining

    Distancing guidelines would have to be followed and businesses would have to apply for a license.

    Abandoned mine reclamation project could begin this fall

    The closure methods include masonry walls, steel grates, rebar barricade and earthen backfill.

    Gas prices ‘stuck in neutral’

    The national average price of gasoline decreased 2.5 cents per gallon in the last week, averaging $2.17 per gallon Monday.