Monday, June 1, 2020

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Moab, UT

71.2 F
Moab
More

    Groups want more time, meetings for BLM grazing regs revisions

    Featured Stories

    Leaving Guatemala

    I selected “send me where I’m needed most,” my desire to immerse myself in another country’s culture not affixed to any location in particular.

    Widespread testing is key to Moab’s path forward

    Once a person develops symptoms of COVID-19, it has likely already been days since they started unknowingly spreading the virus. As such, local health officials want to expand testing locally for the coronavirus.

    County to diversify post-virus

    The impacts of the pandemic have renewed local leaders’ focus on a topic many have worried over for years but must now confront in much starker terms: Economic diversification.

    Arches, Canyonlands to reopen May 29

    Arches and Canyonlands national parks will partially reopen to the public at the end of the month, according to a spokesperson for the parks, following guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state and local public health authorities.

    The party is over at Imagination Station art supply store

    Cindy Sue Hunter serves a customer at her art supply store, Imagination Station, which has been reconfigured to allow shoppers to do what Hunter calls “door shopping."

    Where is broadband available in Moab?

    When the superintendent of Utah schools announced last month that school would...
    Carter Pape
    Carter Papehttp://moabtimes.awebstudio.com/author/carter-pape/
    Reporter Carter Pape covers news out of the Grand County Council Chambers, including housing, tourism, crime, and more.
    Cattle graze on Bureau of Land Management land in Oregon. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

    Thirty-seven conservation groups representing millions of members sent the Bureau of Land Management a letter on Friday, Feb. 14, requesting additional time to comment on the agency’s proposed grazing regulation revisions.

    The BLM manages livestock on 155 million acres of public land in 11 states, and any regulatory changes will have significant environmental impacts across the West. The BLM is having four public meetings in remote locations: Elko, Nevada; Las Cruces, New Mexico; Miles City, Montana; and Casper, Wyoming), and is offering a very short public comment period to take recommendations on its process.

    “The BLM has deliberately scheduled meetings in far-flung places in what appears to be an effort to stymie public participation,” said Josh Osher, policy director for Western Watersheds Project. “The combined population of the meeting locations is less than 200,000 people, a tiny fraction of the 280 million public lands users annually who will be affected by the proposed changes.”

    The BLM is currently in the scoping period of its proposed revisions and has announced that it will seek to change the permitting process, the public participation aspects of grazing decisions, and how and where it will evaluate landscape health in relation to livestock grazing.

    “This is another example of this administration’s efforts to limit review and participation in decisions that affect public lands, including habitat for threatened and endangered species, recreation areas, Native American cultural sites, and wilderness,” stated Judi Brawer, Wild Places program director for WildEarth Guardians. “The BLM is supposed to act in the best interest of all peoples who use these lands, not just the ranchers.”

    “Changes to the grazing regulations could affect nearly 5 million acres of America’s most protected wilderness lands,” said George Nickas, executive director of Wilderness Watch. “The public needs and deserves more than a few weeks to review the proposal and provide meaningful recommendations to ensure these extraordinary lands are not harmed.”

    Editor’s note: The Times-Independent published the BLM’s meeting notice on this issue in the Feb. 13 edition. Readers can find it on the T-I’s website at moabtimes.com/2020/02/14/blm-continues-review-of-cattle-grazing-regulations/

    Share this!

    - Advertisement -

    Latest News

    City cuts jobs to bridge huge tax loss

    These steps are in addition to cuts made March 13 when 60 part-time employees were terminated.

    Youth spots fire, alerts authorities

    "They (firefighters) figured out where the fire was coming from … it started with a cigarette.”

    Broken bones in Left Hand

    All but one of the injuries involved jumping from rocks into a shallow pool at the base of a waterfall.

    Employment data confirms Grand is among worst hit in state

    The figures confirm earlier estimates that roughly one in five to one in six jobs in Grand County have been lost to COVID-19.

    Widespread testing is key to Moab’s path forward

    Once a person develops symptoms of COVID-19, it has likely already been days since they started unknowingly spreading the virus. As such, local health officials want to expand testing locally for the coronavirus.