Friday, May 29, 2020

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Moab, UT

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    Moab PD offers fingerprinting services for driver privilege cards

    Featured Stories

    Arches, Canyonlands to reopen May 29

    Arches and Canyonlands national parks will partially reopen to the public at the end of the month, according to a spokesperson for the parks, following guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state and local public health authorities.

    County to diversify post-virus

    The impacts of the pandemic have renewed local leaders’ focus on a topic many have worried over for years but must now confront in much starker terms: Economic diversification.

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    Cindy Sue Hunter serves a customer at her art supply store, Imagination Station, which has been reconfigured to allow shoppers to do what Hunter calls “door shopping."
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    MVMC lauds Tuesday, Thursday hours

    From the left is Zaida Agreda, Rhiana Medina, both of Moab Valley Multicultural Center; Kelli Day of the Moab Police Department, and MVMC’s Bradia Holmes and Joanna Onorato. Courtesy photo

    Note: These services have been suspended as the City of Moab works to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

    People who seek fingerprinting services in order to obtain a Driving Privilege Card have been forced to travel to Taylorsville or Vernal — until now. Driving Privilege Cards, also known as DPCs, are issued by the Utah Driver License Division to eligible drivers who do not meet the Utah Class D Driver License requirements.

    Advocates from the Moab Valley Multicultural Center had asked the City of Moab to consider offering fingerprinting services locally after seeing the high number of DPC seekers face the unnecessary burden and expense of traveling 200 miles or more to get to a Bureau of Criminal Investigations office.

    “We saw too many of these DPC-eligible drivers ending up in traffic court for the charge of no valid license,” said MVMC Executive Director Rhiana Medina. “We want everyone to drive safely and with permission. We are thrilled that the Moab Police Department invested in the Live Scan machine so people can get fingerprinted right here in town.”

    BCI fingerprinting can be done from 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursdays at police headquarters at City Hall, 217 East Center St. The cost is $30 for DPC fingerprinting and $10 for other fingerprinting services. Questions can be directed to Kelli Day at 435-259-8938.

    People who seek fingerprinting services in order to obtain a Driving Privilege Card have been forced to travel to Taylorsville or Vernal — until now. Driving Privilege Cards, also known as DPCs, are issued by the Utah Driver License Division to eligible drivers who do not meet the Utah Class D Driver License requirements.

    Advocates from the Moab Valley Multicultural Center had asked the City of Moab to consider offering fingerprinting services locally after seeing the high number of DPC seekers face the unnecessary burden and expense of traveling 200 miles or more to get to a Bureau of Criminal Investigations office.

    “We saw too many of these DPC-eligible drivers ending up in traffic court for the charge of no valid license,” said MVMC Executive Director Rhiana Medina. “We want everyone to drive safely and with permission. We are thrilled that the Moab Police Department invested in the Live Scan machine so people can get fingerprinted right here in town.”

    BCI fingerprinting can be done from 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursdays at police headquarters at City Hall, 217 East Center St. The cost is $30 for DPC fingerprinting and $10 for other fingerprinting services. Questions can be directed to Kelli Day at 435-259-8938.

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