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    COVID-19: Utah receives $87M to expand testing

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    The Department of Health and Human Services has provided more than $87.4 million in new funding to Utah to support testing for COVID-19.

    covid testing tent at MRH
    File photo

    In total, $10.25 billion in funding is being provided by The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to states, territories, and local jurisdictions through CDC’s existing Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Prevention and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases (ELC) cooperative agreement.

    This funding is part of a broader federal effort to ensure that states, territories and tribes have the resources necessary to meet their testing goals as they begin to reopen.

    This funding from the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act will provide critical support to develop, purchase, administer, process and analyze COVID-19 tests, conduct surveillance, trace contacts, and related activities. These funds, along with the previous funding support CDC provided, will help states, territories, and localities with their efforts to reopen America, according to the HHS.

    “This funding … for state, tribal and local public health activities is a historic investment in America’s ability to track and control the spread of the virus, which is essential to a safe reopening,” said HHS Secretary Alex Azar. “For the sake of all Americans’ health and wellbeing, we must help Americans get safely back to work and school, and that requires continued expansion of testing, surveillance and contact tracing.”

    “As the nation cautiously begins the phased approach to reopening, this considerable investment in expanding both testing and contact tracing capacity for states, localities, territories and tribal communities is essential,” said CDC Director Robert R. Redfield, MD. “Readily accessible testing is a critical component of a four-pronged public health strategy — including rigorous contact tracing, isolation of confirmed cases, and quarantine. As communities move toward a blended mitigation and containment strategy, I encourage all Americans to continue to embrace powerful public health measures — social distancing, hand washing and face coverings. We are not defenseless in the battle against this pandemic.”

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